A List of Beautiful Broken Things

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Found on Facebook. On somebody’s Facebook Page. Shared by other Facebook Pages. My news feed is too long and crazy to search for it again.

A shopping list (noun) is a list of items needed to be purchased by a shopper, a grocery list is the most popular type of shopping list– including items that need to be procured on the next visit to the grocery store.

Kintsukuroi is a Japanese noun meaning “to repair with gold”; the art of repairing pottery with gold or silver lacquer and understanding that the piece is more beautiful for having been broken.

Hard to believe the queen of lists missed the shopping list prompt for the promptless.  It certainly wasn’t for lack of lists floating around in my life.  Just maybe it was all those other things floating around with them that I’m too lazy to grab hold of and run with.

So, two prompts in one – Voila! – a list-y poem about breaks.  No, I can’t explain how I came up with that exactly.  But that’s the beauty of poetry – the inspiration for it rarely makes sense. And I’m going with the part of the prompt that said to make up my own.

I have plagiarized and hopefully improved upon my own work from a previous poem.  I won’t link to it, because it sucked even worse than this one.  But I’m having fun!  And that’s all that really matters, right?  Don’t be critical, you could break my heart.

broken vase

broken vase (Photo credit: Leonard John Matthews)

Things That Break

When dawn breaks,

Morning has broken.

Night falls, but it never breaks.

Give a guy a break and break it to him gently.

Then take a coffee break.

Go ahead and break a leg, break a horse,

Break the connection, break a code.

Break away and break bad habits.

But don’t step on a crack and break your mothers back.

Don’t break in and don’t break out.

Don’t break mirrors, don’t break your neck.

I’ve broken up, I’ve broken down.

Broken hearts, broken promises,

And the silences that must be broken

Before we break apart .

Break a record, break a rule,

But never break a spirit or anybody’s bones.

Precious things get broken.

When you add up all the shattered bits of china

What are the broken pieces worth?

It’s impossible to say.

Might as well try to break it down

For every sorry fragment

Of a broken dream.

Broken Dreams

Broken Dreams (Photo credit: jumpinjimmyjava)

Related links:

the matticus kingdom – and what a story it is

Mahabore’s Mumblings – A real hero

The D / A Dialogues – Broken

Chell Speckers Nightmare

ForThePromptless – S. 3, E. 9 – Lapsus Linguae

A noun that refers to a “slip of the tongue”.  Malapropisms and spoonerisms are two examples.

It was a dark and stormy night...

It was a dark and stormy night… (Photo credit: jpstanley)

 

We, on a stark and dormy night,

Brawled under the clankets, eyes shut tight;

Fhosts were gloating up our stairs,

Woblins and Gitches creeping in pairs.

A morrible Hummy banged on our door -

We shushed each other and listened for more.

Dronsters and Magons were under the bed

Bire freathing creatures that hadn’t been fed.

We didn’t cuss, we didn’t fry,

We kept sterfectly pill so as not to die.

Foney bingers tapped the window pane,

Wad molves howled in the pouring rain.

We fruddled in a hightened heap

And then, somehow, we fell asleep.

Suddenly, as if night never was

Morning came, as morning does.

The sky was shining, the sun was blue,

Dom and Mad had not one clue.

As if last night had never been,

As if we’d sad a hilly dream.

But we KNOW what happens in the dead of night

When we set so gared we can’t talk right.

Love Letter to My Life

From Therapy Room on Facebook

From Therapy Room on Facebook

Dear Life of Mine,

I don’t know what I’d do without you.  Well, I guess deep down I do know that without you there would simply be no me.  That would suck.  I know sometimes I say that YOU suck, but of course I don’t mean it.  Not really.

Mostly I love you to pieces.

I love you when you’re busy and crazy and tell me to hurry up, but I love you more when you’re laid back and mellow and lazy. I love how you make me breathe the air, see and touch and hear and know the incredible beauty of all the other lives around me.

I love that you are funny and strange and complicated.  I love your ups and downs and detours.  I love your crazy joy.  I even love your sadness.  Your bad bits teach me to embrace and appreciate your happy side and all the good things that fill you up and make you so worth living.

I love that you are beautiful and good.  Sometimes I think you’re hard, but then I look around and see others who are not so lucky and not so blessed.

I am so very grateful to have you. I know how fragile you are, and I try every day to do the right things so that you’ll be around for a long, long time.

I know one day we’ll have to part.  But let’s not let fear and worry kill the fun we’re having in each small moment, okay?  I know you will always give me a kick in the ass when I need it and that’s okay. I will still love you with all my heart.  And all my might. For however long we have together.

I love you, my wonderful life, no matter how you may change in the blink of an eye; right here, right now, just the way you are.

********************************************

Prompts For The Promptless:  Sometimes called a billet-doux, or a love letter, a love note is a personal letter to a loved one expressing affection.  The loved one does not necessarily have to be animate, human, alive, or known.

Weekly Writing Challenge:  Blogging Events

The Joy of Being Booked

fall reading

Photo Credit “Eat Sleep Read”

Prompts For The Promptless Approach-approach conflict is the psychological conflict that results when a choice must be made between two desirable alternatives.

Oh for a life filled with nothing but approach-approach conflicts!  Should I read a book or take a nap?  Pick up an actual paperback or flip open my Kindle?  Read inside or outside? Or upside down?

I think I was born to read.  Time on my own with a book is one of this life’s greatest pleasures. I’m always just one good book away from an excellent mood.

Books are time travelling magic and sometimes it’s hard to start a new book when I’m still living in the last one.  And sometimes it’s equally hard to read just one book at a time.  I will be in the middle of something when I decide to download the next great read, and then I’m impatient to get into that as well.  Often I have three open books in three different places and my kindle collection in hand.  My head is full of delicious choices.

What authors mind and voice and soul will speak to me today?  Decisions, decisions.

From "Therapy Room by Joanna Cross" page on Facebook

From “Therapy Room by Joanna Cross” page on Facebook

The Closest of Confidants

Two little girls in bed, playing with Japanese...

We were kids pretending, playing roles

Being the characters, wearing the clothes

Making up stories, saying the lines

There were no limits and no confines

But no matter who we decided to be

You were you and I was me.

Together now it seems as though

Our grown up selves are just for show.

The walls come down, the pretense dies

We see through each others thin disguise

No matter how old or long apart

You know my honne, I know your heart.

We are at peace and safe and free

When you are you and I am me.

Prompts for the Promptless:  Honne is a Japanese noun referring to the behavior and opinions someone truly believes in– often displayed with one’s closest confidants.

Amphigory Diggery Dock

The Old English epic poem Beowulf is written i...

The Old English epic poem Beowulf is written in alliterative verse and paragraphs, not in lines or stanzas. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Prompts for the Promptless Season Three, Episode Three:  An amphigory is a piece of nonsensical writing in verse or, less commonly, prose.  It often parodies a serious piece of writing.

How To Write a Poem In Ten Easy Steps

1.  Get inspired by something.  It doesn’t have to be anything amazing.  In fact it can be as inconsequential as a dust bunny under your bed or a flat tire.  Good poetry comes out of nowhere.

2.  Read poetry by other people, listen to song lyrics and attend poetry readings.  Inwardly scoff.  Then steal lines or phrases or words from several different sources and arrange them randomly on a page. No matter what your topic, this will form an excellent base for your own poem.

3.  Think about what message you want to convey to your readers.  Absolutely do not make it easy for them to figure this out.  Great poetry is always totally confusing.

4.  Choose a style – limerick, sonnet, ballad, villanelle, sestina, haiku – there are hundreds to choose from.  Or you can make up a style of your own.  Be sure to give it some fancy sounding name.  It might catch on, you never know.  If all else fails, free verse is pretty easy and has the fewest annoying rules.

5.  Look up some big interesting sounding words, especially ones with obscure meanings which are difficult to pronounce.  The thesaurus is a poets best friend.

6.  Build a strong structure with your words, sort of like building a tower of blocks in all different sizes and shapes.  There should be rhythm and flow.  Or a big pile of rubble. It is totally your choice.

7.  Use imagery and vivid description which appeals to the senses. Enhance the crap out of everything.  A fire doesn’t just burn, it blazes with monster flames and crackles and spits and shoots sparks into the stratosphere.  Everything in poetry should always be super emotional and intense.

8.  Try to make a few things rhyme here and there, just to show you put a bit of effort into the whole thing.  Pick easy words for this like boy, toy, and Illinois.

9.  Have a punch line.  Poetically speaking, this is better known as a powerful ending.  Go out in a blaze of glory.  But never attempt to explain what your poem actually means.    Refer to step three.  Give your reader something to scratch his head over once he’s plowed his way through to the end.

10.  Share your work.  Read it out loud with a ton of emotion.  Set it to music.  Join an on-line poetry group and ask for suggestions. If others are critical, inwardly scoff.  Refuse to edit, and never apologize.

Each of us has a way of putting language together that is ours alone. So seriously, how hard can this be?  Go ahead and write your poetic little heart out. I hope you find these ten steps helpful.  If not, as a last resort before tossing out your work, try giving it to your mom.  Critics be damned, she will love it unconditionally, simply because it’s yours.

Not So Deep Thoughts From the Void

English: English version of Brain in a vat. Fa...

English: English version of Brain in a vat. Famous thought experiment in philosophy of mind 日本語: 水槽の中の脳。英語版。 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I missed answering the promptless prompt last week about retrocausality  (“can the future affect the present, and can the present affect the past?”) because, frankly, it confused the hell out of me.  I took one set of philosophy classes in my life where everyone sat around a table and argued themselves in bewildering circles, and that was enough with the thought experiments for this poor befuddled little brain.  I passed the course, by the way.  I found out I could say any bizarre thing I wanted and the rest of them (including I guess the professor marking the final exam) would be properly astounded by my deep thoughts.

Well, my thoughts aren’t that deep anymore.  Sometimes I believe we think entirely too long and hard about things and that’s why we get headaches and are all crazy as loons.

Which brings me to the promptless prompt for this week –  L’appel du vide is French and translates to “Call of the Void”.  It is the unexplainable urge to jump when standing on the edge of a cliff, or tall height.  It can be considered a form of self-destructive ideation, or a protective instinct to let the brain play out what the body should not.  It’s definition has been expanded to describe responding mentally to the call of the siren song– whether that means the desire to reach into a fire, drive into a wall, or walk into the eye of the storm.

See?  Bat shit crazy.  With death wishes.  Not a great combination for the survival of our species, is it?

I am going to be alive (although perhaps just barely) in the year 2040. (A psychic told me this, if you’re wondering how I came up with it.)  I believe the reason for my longevity will revolve around the fact that I am a gutless wimp.  I have never in my life experienced the urge to jump off a cliff.  I do not reach into fires.  I crawl under my bed when there’s a storm.

Okay, I made that last bit up, but I certainly don’t go out for a stroll during a tornado watch or drive my car at breakneck speeds like all the other lunatics out there.  Or jump out of airplanes. Or engage in any activity that has the potential to cause physical pain.  Like hot yoga or housework.

Even in my head or my dreams I never do anything even vaguely adventurous.  I do not understand extreme sports like mountain climbing, or taking unnecessary risks or the mindset behind any of that stuff. I think roller coasters are stupid.  I had an adrenaline rush once, but it was from a cortisone injection in the bottom of my foot and completely by accident on my part. I thought I might be having a heart attack but the doctor said it was a normal reaction to the shot, and kind of rolled his eyes when I suggested he might have warned me.  I never went back to him.

I don’t even answer the doorbell or the phone if I’m not expecting a visitor or a call.  So the void can call me all it wants – it will get no response from this chicken-hearted scaredy-cat with a brain that can’t fathom the worst case scenario and has little desire to try.