Terms of Endearment

eye rolling

Mental Floss (where knowledge junkies get their fix) has a page on Facebook from which I have shamelessly stolen this link because it’s SO worth sharing.  You need never run out of cutesy names for your spouse, children, pets, and best friends ever again.

1. “Mon chou”

French, meaning “my cabbage.”

2. “Schnuckiputzi”

German for “cutie pie.”

3. “Sötnos”

“Sweet nose” in Swedish.

4. “Meu Chuchuzinho”

Portuguese for “my little squash.”

5. “Moya Solnishka”

Russian for “my little sun.”

6. “Mijn Bolleke”

“My little round thing” in Flemish.

7. “Bogárkám”

Hungarian, meaning “my little bug.”

8. “Mi cielito”

“My little sky” in Spanish.

9. “Mijn poepie”

A quirky Dutch term for “my little poop.”

10. “Matakia mou”

Greek for “my little eyes.”

11. “Microbino mio”

“My little microbe” in Italian.

12. “Moosh bekhoradet”

“May a mouse eat you” in Persian.

13. “Mo Chuisle”

Irish for “my pulse.”

14. “Min guldklump”

Danish, meaning “my gold nugget.”

15. “Ma puce”

French for “my flea.”

Personally I am now questioning the sanity of the Persians and the Dutch.

Adding to the fun, here’s another link from Mental Floss with alternatives to saying a simple hello.

1) “What’s the craic?”

How they say “What’s up?” in Ireland. The craic (pronounced “crack”) is the news, gossip, latest goings-on, or the fun times to be planned.

2) “How hops it?”

Be classically cool with this late 19th-century slang for “How’s it going?”

3) “Ahoy”

Add a little jaunty excitement by getting into pirate mode.

4) [Hat tip]

Be the strong, silent type and forgo words entirely with an elegant tip of your hat.

5) “There he/she is!”

Make someone feel like the man or the woman of the hour.

6) “Ciao”

Feeling friendly and cosmopolitan? “Ciao” will set the mood. Add a kiss on each cheek for authenticity.

7) “S.P.D.S.V.B.E.E.V”

Want to write a letter with a classical Latin feel? Open with this abbreviation for Salute plurimam dicit. Si vales, bene est, ego valeo. “Many greetings. If you’re well, then that’s good, and I’m well too.”

8) “Salutations”

Show off your verbal dexterity with this gentleman’s greeting.

9) “Greetings”

Or keep it simple and use the word that means just what it says.

10) “Howdy”

Keep it casual, cowpoke, or get fancier with a full-on “Howdydo?”

11) “Aloha”

Bring a little mellow sunshine to your interactions by greeting the Hawaiian way.

12) “Namaste”

Start with a show of respect. This peaceful greeting comes from the Sanskrit for “I bow to you.”

13) “How’s tricks?”

You’ve got to smile when you dust off this gem from the 1920s.

14) “Breaker, breaker”

Open the conversation like a trucker on a CB radio.

15) “Well, look at you!”

Reminiscent of the sweet way your grandma used to express how impressed she was with you. Why not spread the love around with this opening?

And why not choose a random number from each list and combine the two??  It’s not like you have anything better to do on a Sunday, right?  Well maybe you do.  I don’t.

So –  How hops it, schnuckiputzi?  Microbino mio – well – just look at you!

The possibilities are truly mind-boggling. But that’s what Mental Floss is all about, boggles for the mind.  And there you go.  Don’t ever say I have never contributed to your brain scrambled weekend.

endearment

Why This Is Not A Travel Blog

Daily Prompt: There’s No Place Like Home

If you had the opportunity to live a nomadic life, traveling from place to place, would you do it? Do you need a home base? What makes a place “home” to you?

Cover of "Leaving Home"

Cover of Leaving Home

The best nomadic life blog I’ve been fortunate enough to stumble across here in the blogging world is Adventures in Wonderland where Alison and Don chronicle their travels around the world.  I read it faithfully.  I love to see their amazing pictures, and learn things about the places they’ve been and the wonders they’ve seen.   If I had the opportunity to live a life like that, would I do it?

I’m not remotely brave enough to even consider it.  Preparing for a ten day guided tour took me a year and gave me anxiety attacks.  I’m glad I went, but what is up with all the stress involved for me when it comes to travelling?

Here are some true travel facts about me, to prove that I am not descended from nomads.

1.  I will never figure out how to pack a suitcase that doesn’t contain at least a dozen completely useless things that I should have left at home.  I need a separate bag for “just in case” items.  I go away for a weekend and it looks like I’m leaving home for good.

2.  When I was little I suffered from motion sickness.  I threw up in cars, even on short trips.   I can now ride in a back seat or on a bus or even a bumpy plane without a paper sack in front of my face – good news for my travel companions.  But that uneasy childhood feeling of dread before leaving on a trip has never left me.

3.  I am uncomfortable in strange places, strange climates, strange beds.

4.  I don’t like or trust strangers.  Because – they’re strangers.  Ergo, they must be strange.

5.  Foreign languages and accents baffle me. In my ears, even the English language can sometimes sound mysterious as hell.

6.  I don’t like to make decisions.  If we are at some crossroad and you are waiting for me to say which way we should go next, I hope you packed a lunch because we could be sitting here for a very long time.

A contemporary Tibetan nomadic tent near Namts...

A contemporary Tibetan nomadic tent near Namtso lake. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Yes, I need a home base.  The best part of going somewhere for me is always the part where I’m heading home.  Home is where things are ordinary and familiar and mine.  Where I can make a huge mess and the only person who gets annoyed about it is me. Where the water doesn’t do weird things to my hair, and the soap doesn’t irritate my skin.  Where the food is easily identifiable and misplacing my passport is not a major worry.  Where recharging things doesn’t require complicated adapters and a brain.

Now for any of you few select lucky people reading this who are suddenly sceptical about this trip to Greece I’ve said I will make with you next year, don’t worry.  I take instructions really well.  If you say we are having fun, I will believe you and behave accordingly.  Tell me we are going shopping and I will follow you anywhere.  And I love to take pictures.  So I’m probably not the worst travel companion on earth.  I hope you feel reassured.

I know home is not simply one specific place, it’s a feeling of belonging and love and comfort, and I admire the nomadic people who are on an extraordinary adventure, and who can be at home no matter where they are.  They are amazing.  Travel and adventure-wise, they are the opposite of me.