Good Things On A Sunday

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These are good things on any day, really.

- Adult children.  Really, everyone should have a few.

- Finding decaf coffee for my Tassimo.  I have been blind.  (Thank you K and C for inspiring me to use this coffee maker for more than its previously mostly decorative purposes.)

- Blowing snow from the inside looking out.

- Candles that last all day and into the night.

- Driving home in the pouring rain and getting there just before it starts to freeze.

- Old movies on Netflix.

- Looking into the eyes of our children and seeing what miracles we have created.

- Good books, and lots of them.

- Today.

- Flux – a natural state.  (Our moods change, our lives change, our feelings for each other change.  Our bearings change.  The song changes, the air changes, the temperature in the shower changes.)  Accepting this.

- Magic

- A warm bed after a long day.

- Learning new words, like quaintrelle – a woman who emphasizes a life of passion expressed through personal style, leisurely pastimes, charm, and cultivation of life’s pleasures.

- Big warm sweaters.

- The smell of dinner cooking.

- The sound of laughter.

- Having no definite plans.

- Realizing there is really nothing in the world we lack, and rejoicing in the way things are.

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The Joy of Being Booked

fall reading

Photo Credit “Eat Sleep Read”

Prompts For The Promptless Approach-approach conflict is the psychological conflict that results when a choice must be made between two desirable alternatives.

Oh for a life filled with nothing but approach-approach conflicts!  Should I read a book or take a nap?  Pick up an actual paperback or flip open my Kindle?  Read inside or outside? Or upside down?

I think I was born to read.  Time on my own with a book is one of this life’s greatest pleasures. I’m always just one good book away from an excellent mood.

Books are time travelling magic and sometimes it’s hard to start a new book when I’m still living in the last one.  And sometimes it’s equally hard to read just one book at a time.  I will be in the middle of something when I decide to download the next great read, and then I’m impatient to get into that as well.  Often I have three open books in three different places and my kindle collection in hand.  My head is full of delicious choices.

What authors mind and voice and soul will speak to me today?  Decisions, decisions.

From "Therapy Room by Joanna Cross" page on Facebook

From “Therapy Room by Joanna Cross” page on Facebook

Sleepy Baby

Mary Cassatt Sleepy Baby 1910

Sleepy baby close your eyes

Stars are singing lullabies

Moon is shining magic beams

Night is sending happy dreams

Sleep is a boat in a moonlit bay

Close your eyes and sail away

♥♥♥

Trifecta Writing Challenge Week 82:   a children’s bedtime story in exactly 33 words.

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My Own Little Murder of Crows

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One is for bad news.

Two is for mirth.

Three is a wedding.

Four for a birth.

Five is for riches.

Six is a thief.

Seven a journey.

Eight is for grief.

Nine is a secret.

Ten is for sorrow.

Eleven is love.

Twelve is joy on the morrow.

on the menu today, at flickrhoo

on the menu today, at flickrhoo (Photo credit: Jaboney)

Yes, I freely admit it – I count crows.  Someone made up that informative little blurb about what the numbers mean for the benefit of superstitious people like me.  Having discovered this poem (and others like it) I now forever find myself taking the words seriously and assigning deep meaning to having big black birds land in my backyard.

A few days ago there were five crows strutting about back there.  I’ve gotten used to the magpies visiting, but don’t often see the rest of the Corvids family (which includes ravens, crows and blue jays.)  These particular family members are all black, a little scruffy looking, and tricky ominous shape-shifting soul-eating scavengers.  Really, you probably won’t find that description in your bird book, but they do have a reputation.  They are loud, rambunctious, cunning thieves with a plethora of different calls, all of which sound like “Go to Hell” in crow-speak.  A group of them is called a “murder” because (according to me, with no scientific back up for proof)  it always sounds like they are sufficiently pissed off to kill the next thing that crosses their path.

I could also come up with explanations for a jury or an unkindness of ravens;  a parliament of crows, rooks or owls;  a cast of hawks, a knot of frogs, and a skulk of foxes. But maybe I’ll save that for another day when those things present themselves for view from my kitchen window.  A pride of lions, a gaggle of geese, an absence of waiters, an ostentation of peacocks and a brace of orthodontists are all self-explanatory.

This morning there were five crows on my front lawn.  I had a twilight zone moment.  These birds are definitely trying to tell me something.  It could be simply that there are great snacks in my grass, or maybe it’s something much more important, like information on the secrets of balance within my soul (because, you know, that could come from anywhere) or timely advice about purchasing a lottery ticket.  Five is for riches, after all.

Crows are not always harbingers of doom apparently, although I tend to associate them with warnings of danger – death, accidents, sickness, bad weather.  It’s all that gloomy black I guess.  But these birds are also considered by some to be the keepers of sacred law and the mysteries of creation, divine messengers here to guide and protect, bringers of knowledge, seekers of the gates of the supernatural.  Squawking indicators of a change to come.  You never know with crows.

As guardians through the cycle of death and rebirth, the scintillating rainbow
colors in their dark wings remind us that even in the midst of darkness we
have the power to touch the light
.

(Medicine Cards, Jamie Sams and David Carson)

The appearance of crows has long been associated with death omens, dead bodies, battlefields and cemeteries because they are thought to circle in large numbers above sites where animals or people will soon die.  The other side of that is being considered the guardians of ceremonial magic and healing.  Crows have been used for divination and luck, both good and bad.

Somewhere I read that crow medicine people are masters of illusion.  We should not try to figure crow out.  It is the power of the unknown at work, and something special is about to happen.  And that’s all we really need to know about that.

As if that will stop me from counting them.  And constantly checking now for the fabulous five to show up for the third time.

Still Waters Run Deep

still water and treeline

still water and treeline (Photo credit: the|G|™)

What a week.  I am out of practice in the ‘mom’ role, that’s for sure, the proof being that one preteen and one small dog seem to have taken over the entire household which now revolves around them. Not that that’s a bad thing.  God knows we could use some shaking up around here once in a while.

There have been daily rides to and from her school, which is all the way across the city.  W took care of that.  Our granddaughter made her own lunches, studied for her own tests, did her own homework, took her own showers, got herself dressed and ready every morning.  All I did really was make breakfast for her and then get myself off to work.  So it’s kind of a giant mystery why I think I’m tired.

I bought one of the little books in Anne Morelands 1001 Ways to series.  The choices are Confidence, Success, Happiness, Tranquility, Wisdom, Patience - all things I could see no reason to want to improve upon in myself (hahaha – see, I’m so tired I can’t even think straight), so I chose Enlightenment.  Because we could all use some of that, right?

There are no magic recipes, but the book is filled with lots of inspiring quotes.  Probably a thousand and one of them.  Still Waters Run Deep has no source credited, but it’s something one of my teachers said to me once in high school when I was zoned out and daydreaming in class.  Thinking deep thoughts.  Or something like that.  Being quiet on the outside but a very interesting and complicated person on the inside. That’s my story of what he meant by it, and I’m sticking to that interpretation.  Because somehow acting brain-dead doesn’t have as nice a ring to it.

Flower Still Water

Flower Still Water (Photo credit: DeusXFlorida (2,006,995 views) – thanks guys!)

The still waters phrase is a good one to describe my granddaughter too.  She’s a very thoughtful girl who doesn’t say a lot unless it’s something of some importance that needs to be said.  She reads, she writes, she looks things up and she figures things out.  She is already giving dating and relationship advice to her grade six friends.  I sincerely hope it’s not coming from personal experience just yet.

And that she’s not in too great a hurry to grow up.  That will happen fast enough all on its own.