Chell Speckers Nightmare

ForThePromptless – S. 3, E. 9 – Lapsus Linguae

A noun that refers to a “slip of the tongue”.  Malapropisms and spoonerisms are two examples.

It was a dark and stormy night...

It was a dark and stormy night… (Photo credit: jpstanley)

 

We, on a stark and dormy night,

Brawled under the clankets, eyes shut tight;

Fhosts were gloating up our stairs,

Woblins and Gitches creeping in pairs.

A morrible Hummy banged on our door -

We shushed each other and listened for more.

Dronsters and Magons were under the bed

Bire freathing creatures that hadn’t been fed.

We didn’t cuss, we didn’t fry,

We kept sterfectly pill so as not to die.

Foney bingers tapped the window pane,

Wad molves howled in the pouring rain.

We fruddled in a hightened heap

And then, somehow, we fell asleep.

Suddenly, as if night never was

Morning came, as morning does.

The sky was shining, the sun was blue,

Dom and Mad had not one clue.

As if last night had never been,

As if we’d sad a hilly dream.

But we KNOW what happens in the dead of night

When we set so gared we can’t talk right.

About these ads

7 thoughts on “Chell Speckers Nightmare

  1. Pingback: ForThePromptless – S. 3, E. 9 – Lapsus Linguae | The Queen Creative

  2. I really love this! I wish I had had it back when I was teaching, to show both the kids and the parents how much of reading is really just predicting what word should be there, for the text to make sense – how we can actually read this and figure out the meaning without each and every letter being in the right place.

    I would also use it for a writing lesson to show how simple changes can make something so creative, and make the audience see something in a whole new light.

    And added to that, the rhyme and meter are so perfect, and make the whole poem fun to read. I think I could do a week’s worth of lessons from it, and the kids would love it too!

    Like this

  3. Pingback: I was going to marry Balki. | rarasaur

I LOVE reading your comments. Sometimes I even reply to them.

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s