Art du Jour 24

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Although perhaps it’s hard to tell from this round baby head, I’ve been working on softness and subtlety. And patience.

I spent the better part of my Sunday doing this, and still, the eyes are a little too blue, the lips too red, pencils are hard to blend…..and my patience faded with the light, so I stopped and took a picture of my picture in the daylight and this is what you get.

Then I continued watching Scott and Bailey on Netflix.  It’s a good series.  I’m too lazy to find a link, but it’s easily googled.  I like that it was created by, and stars, women.  If you think whatever you’re doing is hard, imagine being a murder investigator.

Christmas prep in earnest tomorrow!  I keep saying that….

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23 thoughts on “Art du Jour 24

  1. Her eyes are fine. I should know. All four of my granddaughters were born with blue eyes. The oldest girl now has almost violet colored eyes. The youngest has very dark blue eyes. The red head has a red head’s shade of blue, and red lips. She never wears makeup.

    The one thing you can say about blue eyes is that they are never the same. The third oldest gal has brown eyes. My daughter has hazel blue-brown eyes. I have grew rims around my dark brown eyes. My dad had really blue eyes.

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  2. Grandmalin, the solution, it is so simple: You have been wrapping gifts, yes? Tissue papers lie around underfoot, yes? Find three of them. Layer them together, apply atop your drawing, mist lightly with a plant spritzer, et, voila! Perfect ighter, subtler tones.

    You’re welcome 🙂 (Mwah-ah-ah!)

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    • That’s an interesting concept, Outlier Babe. In this tissue paper application, would it merely be for a temporary perspective view to help artist envision changes needed? Or would it be intended as a permanent muting of the drawing…if so, will mere water be able to bond and remain, or what would the next step be?

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      • It depends how firmly my tongue was implanted in my cheek (it was in there fairly firmly). However, it would be fun to experiment with “rejected” drawings and tissue paper. One could use spray-on Kraft glue for a dry look or Krylon or the lke, for a more translucent one. Be fun to “dress” a model with tissue paper, I think.

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  3. Speaking from a strictly physiognomic standpoint, babies are generally possessive of features that are incapable of qualifying as Canon of Beauty due to the odd proportions and lack of acquired lines, etc. So, even though we Grandmas are quite sure our grandbaby is simply perfect and most beautiful, the technical aspects and structural elements suggest babies all fall into the Canon of Ugliness for a time out…why do I make this point…I did so in an attempt to help non-art folks realize how very difficult it actually is to capture the features correctly, whether sculpting a model or in sketching. My experiential knowledge of this difficulty comes from skills and techniques I honed in traumatic injury restoration and reconstructive surgical operations — all done post-mortem, of course. That was my specialty…my magic and talent for making small miracles of tragic destruction.

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