Daily Archives: February 13, 2016

BPPV and Me

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Why is snotbag not an acceptable word?  Why?  WHY??? lol

Oh well, there was really no place to put it anyway.  And the word and the game have nothing to do with the subject of this post, but this screenshot has been sitting in my photos for a long time with nowhere to go and I must have thought at some point it was funny and worth sharing.

For the past several days I have been experiencing vertigo and dizziness and intermittent balance issues.  I have had this before.  It’s easy to recognize and a bit of a snotbaggish pain to deal with.

From the Mayo Clinic site by the Mayo Clinic Staff:

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is one of the most common causes of vertigo — the sudden sensation that you’re spinning or that the inside of your head is spinning.

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo causes brief episodes of mild to intense dizziness. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is usually triggered by specific changes in the position of your head. This might occur when you tip your head up or down, when you lie down, or when you turn over or sit up in bed.

Although benign paroxysmal positional vertigo can be a bothersome problem, it’s rarely serious except when it increases the chance of falls. You can receive effective treatment for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo during a doctor’s office visit.

Man, do they ever like repeating ‘benign paroxysmal positional vertigo’, hey?  You will now probably be able to say it in your sleep or repeat it in random conversations to impress unsuspecting people.

Inside your ear is a tiny organ called the vestibular labyrinth. It includes three loop-shaped structures (semicircular canals) that contain fluid and fine, hair-like sensors that monitor the rotation of your head.

Other structures (otolith organs) in your ear monitor movements of your head — up and down, right and left, back and forth — and your head’s position related to gravity. These otolith organs contain crystals that make you sensitive to gravity.

For a variety of reasons, these crystals can become dislodged. When they become dislodged, they can move into one of the semicircular canals — especially while you’re lying down. This causes the semicircular canal to become sensitive to head position changes it would normally not respond to, which is what makes you feel dizzy.

I have been doing the recommended exercises to move the ear crystals back to the right place and things keep getting better with each repetition. Otherwise I’m okay if I keep my head still and stay upright.  If you’ve never experienced this,  its kind of like being inebriated to the point where the room spins one way and you spin the other and your face is suddenly on the floor and you have no idea how it got there.  Not that I’ve ever done that of course.

So don’t say you never learned anything here on the breathing space blog.  I hope this has been wildly educational.  Especially the snotbag part.