Just Jazzy 210

paracosm (n) a detailed, prolonged, imaginary world created by a child; including human, animal and alien creations.

How many glasses of wine does it take for your childhood paracosm to magically come to life again?

One or two, but often zero! That’s how many glasses of wine it takes for my childhood paracosm to magically come to life. How about you?

 

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Ten Things You Should Set On Fire

1.  Your bra.  You know the one I’m talking about.

2.  All notes and letters in your possession containing dangerous secrets.  It’s faster and more effective than eating them.

3.  Your mortgage, once it’s paid.

4.  Zombies.  I don’t know about this one from personal experience, but it sounds like good advice to me.

ADELE - Set Fire To The Rain

ADELE – Set Fire To The Rain (Photo credit: [ captivated ])

5.  The rain, if your name is Adele.

6. Those incense sticks and the aromatic decorative candles that are just sitting around collecting dust.

7.  Your imagination.

8.  Your passion.

9.  Someones heart.

10.  The world.

For numbers seven through ten, don’t use real matches.  But do say something cool like ‘burn, baby, burn.”

Does anyone burn autumn leaves anymore?  We pay yard people to clean them up and cart them away.  We used to rake them up and put them in clear plastic bags to be picked up and composted.  Well, I never did any raking, W did it all.  I’m very opposed to the whole idea, feeling strongly that leaves are meant to cover the grass and protect it from the ravishments of winter.  And then we can all be doubly annoyed with them in the spring.  Plus raking is hard work and I’ve never been a strong advocate of that, ever.

I remember when we were kids jumping into a gigantic pile of leaves and then having to clean up the mess all over again so we could light them on fire.  The smell of burning, smouldering leaves is something so wound up in the whole concept of fall that it’s hard to think proper autumn thoughts without it.

But I guess there’s enough things being set on fire these days.  No need for any more smoke getting in our eyes.

Recipe For A Good Day

Ingredients: (Mix together any old way you want)

Latte wine color

Latte wine color (Photo credit: Majiscup – The Papercup & Sleeve Log)

1 pot coffee brewed from fresh ground beans

1 hot shower including apricot almond (or other) aroma therapy

1 head of hair so short you couldn’t do anything with it if you tried, so don’t even try

1 lazy little dog who is going to sulk and not eat today because he’s been left with you, but that’s okay because he’ll perk up and like you just fine tomorrow

6 or more unread or half-read books and the joy of being able to choose which one you’ll read today

unlimited ice-cold crystal clear water (for yourself and your moody dog)

unlimited brilliant people and things to fire up your imagination right there on your computer screen

12 or more hours of sunny warm weather

1 quiet neighborhood in which to walk a sulking dog

Test_only.jpg

Test_only.jpg (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

1 opened bottle of red wine you forgot you had which needs to be used up right away because OMG, what were you thinking, you can’t waste red wine

2 or 3 leftover things in your fridge to go with the wine, no cooking required

Stir in the delicious fact that there’s

– nowhere you have to go

– nothing you have to do

– an entire day ahead of you and all the time you need to get there and to do it.

Enjoy.

One Hour in a Time Machine…

I’m off to Stonehenge, 5000 or so years ago to discover its secrets and solve its mysteries.

I was there once a mere three years ago, surrounded by gawking tourists, shivering in the cool misty fall air, with an electronic device pressed hard to my ear. A droning voice spewed forth a lot of garbled information to my brain but not much of it found a place there to firmly lodge itself. Later I read a book on the subject, but as interesting as all of it is, there’s altogether too much conjecture and speculation and not enough hard facts to suit me.

So I’d like to see for myself how and why it was built. Find out who is buried there, observe whatever ceremonies were conducted amongst the great stones. Find out why it fell into ruins and its history got lost.

In the allotted hour (which I’m assuming is present time minutes, and that I’ll somehow have to skip 60 minutes of my life as it is presently being lived) I expect I’ll have to zip back and forth several hundred years every five or ten minutes to get it all straight. And knowing me it’s entirely possible that I’ll be just as confused when I get back as when I left.

Maybe some things were meant to remain a mystery, if only to stimulate the imagination.

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