Difficult to Imagine

The table topic question for today:

how

will our culture

change in the

next 100 years

Who decides where the stupid breaks are in these questions with no question marks, and how do they determine the way the words will line up?  I find that weird, and I don’t know why.  And that’s just some introductory blather to delay having to actually answer this question, because it’s a hard one.

All I can say for sure is that there will be a definite GLOBAL culture.  We’re getting more and more mixed up all the time. We move all over the place and we can travel anywhere in the world.   Traditions are not so ingrained because we allow ourselves to experience and adopt whatever we want from cultures that are different from our own.  And then we incorporate parts of those traditions into our own, with variations. We’re more willing to study and understand our human differences, and that will make us realize how much we are basically all the same.   I think people will be much more open to change, and willing to do new things.  Thinking will be on the lines of – okay, that worked then, but now perhaps this will work better – and we’ll be better able to anticipate the consequences of our actions and make informed decisions and agree for the benefit of the majority, and no one’s ultimate detriment.  We will all have access to unlimited knowledge.  There will be no reason and no excuse for ignorance.

Well, in a perfect world that would all be true.  Maybe our world won’t even be around in another 100 years.  We seem to be hell-bent on obliterating it completely.   If there are wars, I hope they’re virtual ones, fought on computer screens for points. I hope we don’t lose the ability to actually speak to each other, and that all this mad texting is just a phase.  I hope we learn tolerance and acceptance and how to love unconditionally,  and what we have to do to keep our world at peace.

And if we don’t get it right and the earth blows up, oh well.  Catch you later in another dimension.

Important Stuff

40 Below in Inuvik 2

What’s more important – where you live or what you do for a living? As soon as I decide which leg is more important to me, my right or my left, I’ll be able to answer that question. Where you live and what you do are often inextricably intertwined. One defines the other. If you’re offered your dream job on the other side of the world you will find a way to relocate to where it’s based to pursue your passion. If you cannot bear to leave the place where you grew up and your family and friends and the house you built yourself, you will find employment in that locality and be thankful for a job that pays enough to allow you to stay where you want to be.

My husband asked me once if I’d follow him to the ends of the earth. How he failed to notice that I’d already done that is a real mind boggler. We’ve lived in Cambridge Bay, Inuvik, Pond Inlet and Yellowknife in the Northwest Territories where he worked as a Wildlife Officer, which proves that I was either in love or insane for those eleven years. Perhaps a little of both. But we went wherever his job took him while our kids were small. Then we had to make a choice in their best interests and we moved “south” where schools and facilities and activities and opportunities were so much better for them. And now that they’re both all satisfactorily grown up and on their own, we can go back to making more selfish choices.

It’s hard to measure and compare the importance of things when their values fluctuate. It’s not a perfect world. Every day we make compromises and concessions and trade-offs in our search for harmony and balance. And if we’re very lucky, no matter where we live or what we’re doing, we find it.

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