Tag Archives: relatives

Sharing My World 75

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Share Your World – November 27, 2017

Yes, it’s really me, back in this empty echoing wasteland of neglect.  I have had good intentions for almost three months but we all know what road is paved with those useless things.  It seems every time I wake up feeling like today is the day for writing something, some terrible thing happens somewhere in the world, and sometimes close to home, and then I just don’t feel like it anymore.  Because I might have to think and talk about it and be all serious for a minute.  Gah.  Who wants that.

We had a good trip east and a great visit with family and friends and I guess I got thoroughly into relax mode and have had a hard time getting out.  There are worse places to be.  Anyway, my world!  Sharing!  Ready or not!

Would you prefer a reading nook or an art, craft, photography studio?

I have an art and craft “space” but it’s beside my off white bed spread and surrounded by newly painted pelican grey walls, so messy splattering is not allowed.  Puts a bit of a damper on wildly reckless creativity.  So a studio would be nice.

A reading nook would also be super, but really you can throw one of those together anywhere there’s a comfy chair or something big enough to recline on.  I do most of my reading in bed to ensure that my dreams are totally bizarre.  If it’s a real book I read until it drops and hits me in the face, and if it’s my kindle, until my eyes burn and refuse to stay open.  So apparently in my world, reading also leads to losing consciousness.

Tell how you are feeling today in the form of a weather report. (For example, partly cloudy, sunny with a chance for showers, etc.)

Foggy with a chance of more fog, but watch for intermittent extremely sunny breaks.  They’ve been known to happen.  If there’s rain it will be gentle, warm and soothing. And it won’t freeze.  Freezing rain is also not allowed.  It should be banned everywhere actually.  Along with all other annoying dangerous shit.  Feel free to mention names if you want.  And add a bit of thunder.

If you could witness or physically attend any event past, present or future, what would it be?

The wedding (or alternatively the spectacular break up, although I’m certainly not predicting or anticipating that) of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle.  Don’t want to physically be there for any of it,  but not being a witness to it all seems impossible.  Unless we’re all suddenly struck deaf and blind.  Might as well wish for something that’s likely to happen.  And if you ever complain about issues with your in-laws, just think of Meghan Markle and what she has to contend with and you’ll feel a lot better about your own comparatively boring situation.

What inspired you or what did you appreciate this past week? Feel free to use a quote, a photo, a story, or even a combination.

Obviously I am very inspired by Savage Chickens. on a daily basis because I subscribed to get emails.  I highly recommend it.

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Sharing My World 44

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SHARE YOUR WORLD – 2016 WEEK 1

As a child, who was your favorite relative?

Eleven aunts, ten uncles, twenty-three cousins…..and that’s not even getting started on my maternal grandmothers hoard of living relations who were ‘greats’ of all sorts…..it’s impossible to name a favourite.  Impossible.  I could probably name two or three I wasn’t too fond of if you want, but why speak ill of the dead?  Actually I’ve always wondered why you’re NOT supposed to do that, so I looked it up.  It is distasteful, disrespectful and even cowardly.  And rude.  Too much like dancing on someone’s grave.  Plus the person you are disrespecting might come back to haunt you.  Do your ill speaking while they’re still alive and can defend themselves I guess.

Really, as a child I was blessed with more relatives than I could keep track of, but of course now I wish I had paid better attention to who they were and where they came from and where they went.  We had company all the time on our farm when I was growing up.  I’ve known a lot of amazing people and it makes me happy knowing I’m related to them.

If you could be a tree or plant, what would you be?

A great big red maple, changing with the seasons.  I would be tall and beautiful, with at least one sturdy strong horizontal branch perfect for a child’s swing.  At the age of one hundred someone can chop me down and make me in to furniture.

What would be your preference, awake before dawn or awake before noon?

There’s a lot of fuss made about sunsets, but have you ever watched the sun rise?  I don’t mean getting out of bed in the dark and rushing around doing stuff and then eventually noticing that it’s light out.  I’ve done a lot of that.  I’ve also been awake before dawn, sitting in a deck chair with a coffee warming my hands, watching the sun come up.  That’s a wonderful way to start your day.  Then you can go back to bed and sleep until noon, but remember to leave that part out when you’re boasting about your incredible pre-dawn experience.

Would you like to sleep in a human size nest in a tree or be snuggled in a burrowed spot underground?

This is such a weird question, I can honestly say I’ve never thought about doing either one of these things.  But no to being underground, thanks.  And I would like the tree nest to be the size of a queen mattress please, because I’ll be taking one of those up there with me.

Bonus question: What are you grateful for from last week, and what are you looking forward to in the week coming up?

I am grateful for my nice warm house and my comfy bed and for not once in my life ever having to sleep in a tree.  We’re getting some cold January weather now and I don’t even want to go out for a walk.  So I’m grateful to have that perfect excuse.

I don’t know what’s going on next week so let’s just say I am grateful to be living in suspense.  What will be will be.

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Sharing My World 8

 

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Artwork courtesy of Middle Granddaughter (it’s nice when granddaughters come in threes) who might one day become famous and then you can say you saw her early work here first.

Share Your World – 2014 Week 44

What is your most vivid memory of the kitchen in your childhood?

We had bright blue cupboards in the shape of a U, and in each angled corner cabinet on the lower half there was a three-tiered lazy susan.  I was six when we moved to that house and had never heard of such things.  To my young impressionable mind everything about them was brilliant, including their bright yellow paint job and how much they could hold, but especially the wonderful name they were known by.  Put it on the lazy susan!  Get it from the lazy susan!  Don’t we have some of that on one of the lazy susans?  I imagine my mother wished she’d never let on that they had a name at all, and was relieved when I got over my initial fascination.  Although there was a little lip on each shelf to keep things in place, if you spun them around too fast stuff would go flying off into the back corners and then one of us kids would have to crawl inside to retrieve whatever would otherwise be lost back there forever.  It was a sad day for me when the old cupboards were replaced with boring brown wooden ones with nary a lazy susan to be found.  See how I still love to say lazy susan? Yeah!  Okay I will stop now.

As a child, who was your favorite relative?

I had so many of them it’s impossible to say.  Aunts and Uncles and cousins galore who came from all over the place to spend time at our farm.  I can truly say there was something to love about every last one of them, and there still is.  Mom had three siblings and Dad had nine.  Grandma was always introducing us to long-lost relatives but I rarely paid attention long enough to figure out who was who.  Of course now I wish I had.  It’s hard to keep big families straight.  Especially when they keep growing up and getting married and having children and splitting up and combining families with somebody else and all the other things families tend to do.  I did like one aunt in particular who had no children of her own.  It was easier to get her undivided attention.  I think we found each other mutually curious and funny and interesting.  Or maybe it was one sided and she had me completely fooled.  I would have liked her anyway.

What did you like or not like most about the first apartment you ever rented?

This is no startling revelation, but I have never lived alone.  I always had room mates when I went away to school, and room mates when I went to work away from home.  Then I got married and had a permanent room-mate.  We lived in a tiny three room house the size of a small garage for several months.  Then we moved to a different town into a basement suite, and when W decided to go back to school we got our first real apartment in a high-rise with an elevator.  Obviously I was impressed with the elevator, otherwise, why mention it?  We had a bedroom, a living/dining area, a little narrow kitchen and a bathroom with two sinks.  Our t.v. sat on the floor and we watched it from two basket chairs.  We had a bed and a table and a couple of kitchen chairs.  That’s it.  The hardwood floor was bare and every sound echoed.  W did most of his school work in the library.  I worked at the University book store.  I bought a long black cloth pea coat at a thrift store for five bucks and wore it until it fell apart.  Good times.

The next year we moved closer to campus in to a married student complex, again living in a one bedroom basement apartment.  There’s nothing I can think of that l loved or hated about any of these places.  They were warm and dry and they were home. And if your friends had to sit on the floor when they dropped over, that was half the fun.

What kind of TV commercial would you like to make? Describe it.

I would ban commercials from every channel except one, which would be called The Annoying Commercial Channel.  It would not be part of any cable package, but strictly optional.  If you were in the market for, say, dish soap, you would be able to select nothing but dish soap commercials and watch them to your heart’s content.  With no program interruptions.  I have many more unworkable ideas for TV if any network people would like to get in touch with me.

Bonus question: What are you grateful for from last week, and what are you looking forward to in the week coming up?

I am so grateful to be spending some time with my grandchildren.  Last night the three youngest ones each read to me from books of their choice.  It’s part of their daily homework to read aloud to someone.  I love how they tackle the big hard words with no fear and use context clues to figure them out.  But mostly I love that they’re learning a love of reading.  That will serve them well all their lives.

Yesterday W had an in-office procedure done on his right hand to straighten out his ring and little fingers.  I am grateful that our daughter was able to drive him to and from his appointment.  I am grateful that I’m not home to hear first hand how things are going and how much pain and misery he is in with the stitches and the bandages and the splint.  I am eternally grateful that I never once considered it might be a good idea for me to become a nurse.  I would not have been good at it.  He sent me a text which said “I’ll beok”…. W. speak for I’ll be ok.  That’s pretty much all any of us really needs to be.  I’ll be grateful next week just to beok.

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Who Says You Can Never Go Home Again?

“Home wasn’t a set house, or a single town on a map. It was wherever the people who loved you were, whenever you were together. Not a place, but a moment, and then another, building on each other like bricks to create a solid shelter that you take with you for your entire life, wherever you may go.”  Sarah Dessen, What Happened to Goodbye

The west veranda at the farm.
The west veranda at the farm.

This is such a simple picture, and yet it brings back a flood of memories for me, even though it was taken on a day when I’m sure I wasn’t even there.  My dad was the only one in his family who made his living by farming.  His siblings were teachers and nurses and professionals, and ended up living in towns and cities.  And all of them – every one – came to visit him and mom here with their families.  If they hadn’t, we would never have known all our aunts and uncles and cousins so well, because running a farm means almost never getting away for trips much longer than a day.  But if the relatives wanted to come and stay?  They were welcomed with open arms.  We had lots of room and the doors were always open.  No offer of help was every refused.  You might end up peeling the potatoes or shelling the peas for your dinner, but you never went away hungry.

The garage is on the far left, then dad, mom, the window to the den, Aunt Lorna, the main door, Aunt Marie, the edge of the big kitchen window, extra lawn chairs, a strange looking wooden whirly decoration that twisted in the breeze, flower beds gone wild.  That little thing hanging on the bricks that resembles a bird house is a box that held a pencil and some notepaper.  On it was written “If at home you do not find us, leave a note that will remind us.”  I once pointed out to my mother that it didn’t make any sense.  If you were away from home, surely you knew that already and didn’t need a reminder of it.  I was just being a mouthy teenager.  But I still think the message is stupid.  And I don’t know why I’ve never forgotten it.

The view to the west was of maple trees bordering the laneway, the bank down to the pond, and fences and fields as far as you could see.    Those numerous round white dots that look like holes are actually real holes in the photograph.  It’s been pinned up to a cork board and shuffled around a lot, stuffed in a box, lost for awhile.  And then it made its way to me.  In this shot it looks like the veranda floor has had some repairs and a new coat of paint.  I remember it being a steely blue grey with loose boards you could lift up and hide things under.  I don’t remember dad ever saying he was tired of nailing them back down.

It’s a summer afternoon, dinner is over, the dishes have been washed and put away, and it’s just too nice to sit inside.  If there are kids around, they’re off climbing trees or throwing sticks for the dog, or gathering firewood for the bonfire in the backyard after the sun goes down.  I can almost hear dads voice, saying something profound in a lazy off-hand manner.  Mom saying “Oh, Hank”, and laughing,  Aunt Lorna’s droll observations (we never knew if she meant to be funny or not) and Aunt Marie’s infectious giggles.

The farm was sold years ago.  We drove by it last October and saw the changes.  The front veranda has been closed in, the barn is being torn down, the gigantic garden has gone to grass.  The house is so old I’m surprised it’s still standing.  It’s just another old building to me now.  It hasn’t been ”home” for a very long time.

And yet in my heart it will always be home whenever I remember all the people who were part of it, and who made it come so alive with laughter and fun.  I’ve had a lot of homes in my life and I carry parts of every one of them with me. The pictures in my head are as vivid as the real ones.  I can visit them anytime I choose, simply by remembering the people I loved who lived there with me, and loved me back.